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Orangerie of Versailles (l’Orangerie de Versailles)
Orangerie of Versailles (l’Orangerie de Versailles)

Orangerie of Versailles (l’Orangerie de Versailles)

Rue de l'Orangerie, Versailles, 78000

The Basics

The Orangery is divided into two main spaces: the building itself and the parterre (freely accessible from the Versailles gardens), where orange, palm, oleander, and pomegranate trees grow in containers along the grassy areas and circular pools. While the Orangery is included as part of admission to Versailles, it’s worth visiting the building and surrounding elaborate gardens with a guide to learn more about the UNESCO World Heritage Site and the historical events that took place here.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Orangery is one of the most architecturally significant parts of Versailles and a must-see for first-time visitors.

  • Remember to bring sun protection for exploring the gardens, as many areas lack sufficient shade.

  • Versailles and its gardens are among the most wheelchair- and stroller-friendly sites in France.

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How to Get There

The Orangery is located just outside the west wing of the Palace of Versailles, between the South Parterre and the Swiss Lake. The closest train station to the palace is Versailles Château Rive Gauche.

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Trip ideas

VersaillesVR: Versailles Palace Virtual Reality Tour

VersaillesVR: Versailles Palace Virtual Reality Tour

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Summer at Versailles: Musical Fountain Shows and Fireworks

Summer at Versailles: Musical Fountain Shows and Fireworks


When to Get There

The best time to enjoy the Orangery is during the warmer months, when the citrus trees are displayed outdoors and you can soak up the grandeur of the building itself. The palace is closed Mondays. Expect crowds on Tuesdays and weekends, especially during summer.

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The Orangery Collection

During the reign of King Louis XIV, citrus trees were brought in from throughout Italy, Spain, and Portugal, many offered as gifts to the king. In the haste to get them to the palace, many of the trees died en route, but that didn’t stop the French monarch from amassing Europe’s largest collection of orange trees.

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