Recent Searches
Clear

Things to Do in Ring of Kerry

Explore southern Ireland on a road trip along the Ring of Kerry, a 110-mile (180-km) scenic route of narrow roads winding around the Iveragh Peninsula. As you cruise along the Atlantic Coast on this mountain road through Kells, Derrynane, and Glenbeigh, you’ll find a number of impressive sights.


The Basics

Most travelers start and end the loop in Killarney and make stops all around County Kerry to see historic seaside villages, Killarney National Park, the rugged Atlantic coast, and a few Irish castles. Many tours depart from other Ring of Kerry towns such as Sneem, Parknasilla, Cahersiveen, and Killorglin, the home of the famous Puck Fair festivities, but if you need transportation to southern Ireland from elsewhere in the country, Ring of Kerry day tours are offered with starting points in Dublin, Kenmare, Cork, Limerick, and Kinsale.


Things to Know Before You

As with many ring roads, there is little room to pass at some points. It’s good to note that all tour buses travel counterclockwise from Killarney and that self-driving travelers can head clockwise for less traffic.


What to See Along the Ring of Kerry

From Ross Castle and Muckross House to Torc Waterfall, Bog Village, and the glacial valley of the Gap of Dunloe, you’ll want to keep your eyes peeled and your camera out. The ring also passes the golden beaches of Inch Beach, the Lakes of Killarney, the Macgillycuddy’s Reeks mountains, Ladies View, and Dingle Bay looking out to the Dingle Peninsula. The coastal side of the loop offers a taste of the Wild Atlantic Way, and in County Kerry’s Waterville, visitors tend to stop for photos with the waterfront Charlie Chaplin statue.


How to Tour the Ring of Kerry from Dublin

The Ring of Kerry loop is one of the most popular day trips available from Dublin, as WiFi-equipped coach tours make it easy to see dozens of sights in one day. Bus tours depart from a main street in Dublin city center and head out on a four-hour drive 185 miles (300 km) southwest to then embark on the 110-mile (180-km) loop. Day trips tend to be quite long (upwards of 14 hours) due to all the driving. If a single day isn’t enough, multi-day tours include accommodation and allow you to see more at a slower pace. The ring can also be reached from Dublin on a rail tour, during which travelers take a train to Killarney and then hop on a coach bus to ride the ring.

Read More
Category

Killarney National Park
star-5
1279
31 Tours and Activities

Killarney National Park, with idyllic lakes and ancient woodlands backed by the serrated MacGillycuddy’s Reeks mountains, is an area of stunning natural beauty. The park is also historically significant, with two heritage buildings on-site: Ross Castle, a 15th-century fortress-turned-hotel, and Muckross House, a stately Victorian estate.

Read More
Ross Castle
star-5
455
20 Tours and Activities

A vision on the shores of Lough Leane, the 15th-century Ross Castle was built as a medieval fortress for an Irish chieftain named O’Donoghue, and was said to be one of the last strongholds to fall to the brutal English Cromwellian forces in the mid-16th century. The ruin has been restored, and features lovely 16th- and 17th-century furniture.

Read More
Blasket Islands
star-5
370
6 Tours and Activities

Off the coast of the Dingle Peninsula, a group of abandoned sandstone islands rise out of the Atlantic Ocean. For hundreds of years, the Blasket Islands (Na Blascaodai) were home to an Irish-speaking population; however, in 1953 the Irish government decided that, due to their isolation, the islands were too dangerous for habitation and ordered a mandatory evacuation.

Read More
Ring of Beara
star-5
5
2 Tours and Activities

The Ring of Beara is a circular road around the Beara Peninsula in southwest Ireland. It follows the coast and is about 85 miles around. The road begins in Kenmare in Kerry County, and you can go in either direction around the loop. The road passes through several small villages along the way, including Castletownbere, Bonane, Lauragh, Ardgroom, Eyeries, and Allihies. You can also see mountainous landscapes, jagged cliffs, waterfalls, lakes, the Atlantic Ocean, and herds of sheep.

The Uragh Stone Circle, a neolithic stone circle with some stones reaching almost 10 feet tall, is also located along this journey. A few islands are located just off the coast of the peninsula. One in particular is Dursey Island which is reachable by cable car. Healy Pass offers the best viewing point on the Beara Peninsula. A rock tunnel called Caha Pass connects Kenmare to Glengarriff in Cork County. There is also a 122 mile walking trail for those who would rather take it slowly and see the area on foot.

Read More
Cahergall Stone Fort
star-5
223
10 Tours and Activities

Dating back to the seventh century, this ring fort is one of several such structures dotted around County Kerry. Restored to better resemble its original state, this circular stone structure features sturdy stone walls up to 16.4 feet (5 meters) thick and 6.6 feet (4 meters) high, and affords stunning views down to the Atlantic coast.

Read More
Torc Waterfall
star-5
617
24 Tours and Activities

Experience the natural beauty of County Kerry with a visit to the Torc Waterfall. Located a short walk from the Killarney–Kenmare road, in Killarney National Park, Torc Waterfall is part of the River Owengariff and flows into Muckross (Middle) Lake. The site is a popular spot on the area’s scenic drives and hiking routes.

Read More
Muckross House, Gardens & Traditional Farms
star-5
186
19 Tours and Activities

One of Ireland’s finest stately mansions, the 65-room Muckross House was built for the Herbert family in 1843. Muckross House, Gardens & Traditional Farms sits on the shores of Muckross Lake and is replete with period furnishings and decorative objectives. Three recreated farms on the estate showcase the life of rural dwellers in the 1930s and ’40s.

Read More
Ladies View
star-5
465
19 Tours and Activities

In the heart of Killarney National Park, Ladies View has a way of showing that natural beauty is timeless. Back in 1861, when Queen Victoria’s ladies-in-waiting visited this Kerry overlook, they were so enamored with the view of the lakes that the picturesque promontory still carries their regal name today. From this panoramic overlook off of N71, gaze down on the three lakes that sit at the middle of the park, and since the light here is constantly changing, if you simply sit and reflect for an hour you may see rainbows, shadows and beams of light that dance on the surrounding hills. Just up the road from the main overlook, there is another parking area with a small trail that offers views of the upper lake, and when standing here on this windswept ridge gazing out on the view below, it’s like looking through a portal to Ireland’s past—where the raw beauty of the Irish countryside exists in its natural state.

Read More
Ballycarbery Castle
star-5
113
6 Tours and Activities

Set atop a grassy pasture overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, this crumbling, ivy-covered castle is one of Ireland’s most romantic ruins. The castle, which originally dates back to the 16th century, was damaged during the 17th-century War of the Three Kingdoms. Now, only parts of the structure, such as its high stone walls, remain in place.

Read More
Valentia Slate Quarry
star-5
28
4 Tours and Activities

Located on Valentia Island, the Slate Quarry was opened in 1816 by the Knight of Kerry, and supplied slate to London’s prestigious Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey. The quarry operated for almost 100 years before it was closed by a rock fall in 1911.

Read More

More Things to Do in Ring of Kerry

Muckross Abbey

Muckross Abbey

star-5
117
6 Tours and Activities

Founded in the 1440s as a Franciscan Friary, the Muckross Abbey, like many religious sites in Ireland, has a long and violent past. Damaged and rebuilt several times, what remains is an intriguing collection of well-preserved mossy ruins. Visitors are drawn to the beloved yew tree, thought to be more than 500 years old, that grows within the Abbey walls.

Learn More
Derrynane Beach

Derrynane Beach

star-5
8
1 Tour and Activity

Backed by dunes, green hills, and wave-worn rocks, this vast expanse of sugary soft, seaweed-free white sand looks almost Caribbean when the sun shines. It’s a popular spot for swimming and beach walks, and at low tide, it connects to Abbey Island, home to the ruins of the sixth-century Derrynane Abbey.

Learn More
Derrynane House

Derrynane House

star-5
55
6 Tours and Activities

The former home of Irish politician Daniel O’Connell, Derrynane House is packed with period furnishings and exhibits related to the statesman, who campaigned for Catholic emancipation in the 19th century. The house sits within Derrynane National Historic Park, which encompasses woodland trails, walled gardens, and scenic shoreline.

Learn More
Gougane Barra

Gougane Barra

star-5
3
2 Tours and Activities

When strolling through the trees of the Gougana Barra National Forest Park, and gazing out at the placid waters of Gougana Barra’s lake, you can see why this corner of southwestern Ireland was a place of historical solace. It was here on the island in the middle of the lake, that St. Finnbar—patron saint of Cork—founded a monastery in the 6th century before eventually moving to Cork. When visiting the Gougane Barra today, the most popular site is St. Finnbar’s Oratory on a small island in the lake. With its romantically elegant stone design, this 19th-century, picturesque church is a popular spot for weddings, and it’s also a holy pilgrimage site—where Roman Catholics would hold secret Mass away from the Anglican Church. Behind the lake is the National Forest Park and its system of hiking and biking trails, which pass through woods that are densely forested in Sitka Spruce and Pine. This is also the site of the River Lee—which meanders its way through Cork—and while Gougane Barra is most often visited as a relaxing day trip from Cork, there’s also a small, family-run hotel that’s open from April-October.

Learn More
Leacanabuaile Fort

Leacanabuaile Fort

3 Tours and Activities

Set on a grassy outcrop with sweeping views of the surrounding countryside, the remote Leacanabuaile Fort is a worthwhile addition to any tour of the beautiful Ring of Kerry. The original fort, thought to date back to the ninth or 10th century, has been partially reconstructed to give a better sense of its original features.

Learn More
Skellig Experience

Skellig Experience

3 Tours and Activities

Situated on neighboring Valentia Island, the Skellig Experience Visitor Centre showcases the history and habitats of the Skelligs, two remote and rocky islets off Ireland’s southwest coast. Exhibits document the history of the UNESCO-listed Skellig Michael monastic settlement, Skellig Lighthouses, and the wildlife of the islands.

Learn More