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Cibeles Fountain (Fuente de Cibeles)
Cibeles Fountain (Fuente de Cibeles)

Cibeles Fountain (Fuente de Cibeles)

Free admission
Plaza Cibeles, 28014 Madrid

The Basics

Featuring two lions pulling a chariot on which sits Cybele the Greek goddess of fertility, the Cibeles Fountain is definitely not understated. Designed by the architect Ventura Rodriguez for King Carlos III in 1782 the fountain stands at the center of the Plaza de Cibeles, next to Madrid City Hall and the Banco d’España.

The fountain’s original function was to provide clean drinking water to the city’s residents, but today it’s purely decorative. Locals often arrange to meet here before heading out for a drink or some tapas, and tourists are sure to pass by during their stay—on a guided bus, bike, or tuk-tuk ride, guided walking tour, or on the way to the Prado Museum or Gran Via’s many brand name stores.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The fountain is in the middle of a traffic island, so you might not be able to get up close to see it.
  • See if you can spot the “keys to the city” that Cybele holds in her outstretched hand.
  • The fountain is in the heart of the city and is walking distance from many other important landmarks and museums.
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How to Get There

The Cibeles Fountain stands at the intersection of the Paseo del Prado, Calle Alcala and Paseo de Recoletos. The closest metro station is Banco d’España, just a few moments away. Hop-on-hop-off buses stop nearby at xx and you’ll find taxis passing by at all times of the day.

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Trip ideas

Corral de la Moreria: Virtual Flamenco Shows in Madrid

Corral de la Moreria: Virtual Flamenco Shows in Madrid


When to Get There

The fountain is in the center of a public square, accessible 24 hours a day. There’s always a buzz in this part of town, from tourists heading to the museums to office workers running to start their day or friends heading out to dinner.

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Wildcard

Get a Taste of Aristocratic Life in Spain Head to the Cerralbo Museum close to the Plaza d’España to see just how opulent life was for aristocratic Spanish families in the 19th century. With walls lined with marble, and over 50,000 priceless items on display—plus lashings of gold leaf—the former palace of the 17th Marquis of Cerralbo, Enrique de Aguilera y Gamboa, is one of the city’s most unique museums.

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