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National Museum of History and Art (Musee National d'Histoire et d'Art)
National Museum of History and Art (Musee National d'Histoire et d'Art)

National Museum of History and Art (Musee National d'Histoire et d'Art)

Marché-aux-Poissons, Luxembourg, 2345

The Basics

Three permanent collections are housed in the MNHA’s central building: Fine Arts, which provides an overview of Luxembourgish and European painting; the Coin Cabinet, a display of coins, medals, and money-related technology; and Archaeology, an exhibition of artifacts ranging from prehistory to the Middle Ages in an underground gallery space. The Wiltheim Wing, added in 2014, displays the museum’s Arts and Crafts collection featuring decorative and functional arts through the ages, from furniture to vehicles.

Since the museum is best experienced at a leisurely pace, a hop-on hop-off tour bus is a convenient way to explore it—and the city—on your own time without the stress of navigating.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The National Museum of History and Art is ideal for culture creatures and first-time visitors to Luxembourg.

  • Standard admission to the MNHA is free. The top floor, which houses temporary exhibits, requires an admission fee.

  • Njörd Café offers snacks and meals prepared with fresh, local, ingredients.

  • The gift shop sells art-related books and knickknacks.

  • The museum is accessible to wheelchair users.

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How to Get There

Located on the eastern edge of Luxembourg City’s center on Rue Wiltheim, the National Museum of History and Art is easily accessible on foot. The nearest transit stop is Kasinosgaass on buses 19 and 20; Knuedler, Place du Théâtre, and Saint Esprit parking lots are located nearby.

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When to Get There

The museum is open from 10am to 6pm Tuesday through Sunday, and to 8pm on Thursday. On Thursdays, admission to temporary exhibits is free between 5pm and 8pm.

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The MNHA and World War II

The Archaeological Society of Luxembourg began collecting artifacts in the 1860s, but it was only in 1922 that the government agreed to turn their collection into a funded museum. Just before the opening ceremony, however, World War II broke out and the Nazis occupied Luxembourg. Objects hidden in safe locations were retrieved after the war, and the museum was finally opened in 1946.

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