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St. Audoen's Church
St. Audoen's Church

St. Audoen's Church

Free admission
14 High Street, Dublin, Ireland

The Basics

Visitors can explore the church independently or join one of the 30-minute guided tours that depart throughout the day from the church’s visitor center. Guides reveal the long and fascinating history of the building and share stories about ghost sightings that have been reported here. The church is also often visited on ghost tours of Dublin.

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Dark Dublin Guided Walking Tour
Dark Dublin Guided Walking Tour
$14.95 per adult
Traveler Favorite
Great Tour!
This was probably the highlight of my visit to Dublin. Loads of interesting stories! Ciaran is a fantastic tour guide and was super helpful with providing information about restaurants and spots in Dublin as well.
Lorene_K, Nov 2021

Things to Know Before You Go

  • St. Audoen’s Church is a must for history buffs.

  • The church offers partial access for wheelchair users.

  • For more information on the church, stop by the visitor center, which is situated in St. Anne’s Chapel at the site.

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How to Get There

You’ll find St. Audoen’s Church in the Liberties, a historic part of the city that is also home to the Guinness Storehouse, Christ Church Cathedral, and Dublinia. The church is about 15 minutes’ walk from Grafton Street. Dublin Bus routes 13, 40, 123, and 747 all stop nearby.

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When to Get There

The church is open to the public between mid-April and late October. Despite its status as the longest-operating church in Dublin, St. Audoen’s is not well-known among tourists. This means that even during the peak visitor months of July and August, this sight is rarely crowded.

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Highlights of the Church

From a narrow alley around the side of the church, steps lead down to Cook Street and the sole surviving gate from the original Dublin city walls, which were erected to protect the citizens of medieval Dublin. The church’s porch is also home to a ninth-century gravestone known as the Lucky Stone. During medieval times, worshippers are said to have touched the stone, believing it could bring good fortune.

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