Recent Searches
Clear
Mexic-Arte Museum
Mexic-Arte Museum

Mexic-Arte Museum

star-4
7 Reviews
419 Congress Avenue, Austin, Texas, 78701

The Basics

The 20,000-square-foot Mexic-Arte Museum includes two small galleries on the ground floor with rotating exhibits designed to present diverse artistic viewpoints through multimedia works, sculptures, paintings, and photographs. The museum also celebrates culturally important holidays, such as Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). During the yearly festival, a variety of ofrendas (or altars) created by artists or community groups in memory of loved ones are on display.

Show all

Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Mexic-Arte Museum is a worthwhile stop for anyone interested in art and Chicano or Latino culture.

  • There is a small admission fee with discounts for senior citizens, students, and children 12 and under.

  • The on-site gift shop sells artwork and one-of-a-kind Austin souvenirs.

  • Food, drinks, and backpacks are not allowed in the museum galleries.

Show all

How to Get There

The Mexic-Arte Museum is at Congress Avenue and Fifth Street in downtown Austin, approximately six blocks south of the Texas Capitol Building and seven blocks west of I-35, the main thoroughfare to downtown. Metered street parking is available near the museum, and there are paid parking garages nearby. If you take the Capital Metro bus, the nearest stop is Lavaca and 4th streets.

Show all


When to Get There

The museum is open daily. Check the website for hours and upcoming exhibitions, and note that there may be closures due to transitions between exhibits. For the Día de los Muertos exhibits, visit in fall, from mid-September through November.

Show all

Día de los Muertos

Day of the Dead in Austin is a citywide celebration that coincides with All Saints’ Day (traditionally celebrated between Nov. 1 and 2). The Mexic-Arte Museum and other cultural groups host the Viva la Vida parade, concerts, and family-friendly activities, from making altars to decorating sugar skulls. Visitors are encouraged to dress up, paint their faces like calaveras (skulls), and partake in this happy tradition of remembering loved ones who have passed away.

Show all