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Baksei Chamkrong Temple (Prasat Baksei Chamkrong)
Baksei Chamkrong Temple (Prasat Baksei Chamkrong)

Baksei Chamkrong Temple (Prasat Baksei Chamkrong)

Angkor Archaeological Park, Angkor Wat, 17000

The Basics

Baksei Chamkrong is located within the Angkor Archaeological Park. Gain access with the park ticket, which comes in 1-day, 3-day, and 7-day options. As one of the area’s smaller temples, Baksei Chamkrong is not a very common destination on Angkor tours. Still, private guides and drivers will be happy to stop here on request. Otherwise, visit on a bicycle or scooter, or swing by on foot before or after visiting Angkor Thom, Phnom Bakheng, or less visited Prasat Bei.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Baksei Chamkrong will be of interest to history buffs.

  • The stairs to the top of Baksei Chamkrong are extremely steep. Take care if you decide to climb.

  • Grass and uneven surfaces here present some challenges for travelers who use wheelchairs and would like to see the exterior of Baksei Chamkrong.

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How to Get There

Baksei Chamkrong stands close to Phnom Bakheng, just south of Angkor Thom within the Angkor Archaeological Park. It’s about 5 miles (8 kilometers) from downtown Siem Reap, and there’s no public transport. Whether exploring independently or as part of a tour, most travelers stop by on their way to Angkor Thom or Phnom Bakheng.

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Trip ideas

How to Spend 2 Days in Angkor Wat

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Must-See Temples at Angkor Wat

Must-See Temples at Angkor Wat


When to Get There

Baksei Chamkrong is open from early in the morning until late afternoon. It’s rarely busy, despite its location, so plan your day’s itinerary around other, bigger-ticket attractions, and visit this one when it fits in. Please note: The pyramid isn’t high enough to make it a realistic sunset option.

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What’s in a Name?

Baksei Chamkrong was built during a troubled time for the Khmer empire, shortly before the capital moved away from Angkor to Koh Ker (it would later return). The temple’s name means “The Bird Who Gives Shelter Under Its Wings.” Allegedly, a king was trying to escape Angkor while it was under siege when a mighty bird landed and offered him shelter.

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